Playing Cards Switzerland

Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a country in the west of Europe with neighboring countries Germany, France, Italy, Austria and Liechtenstein. Switzerland does not officially have a capital, but nevertheless Bern is commonly referred to as "Federal City".

Schweizer Spielkarten - Spielkarten Schweiz

Switzerland is full of different playing card traditions for historical reasons. In Switzerland people play cards with two different patterns playing cards French cards and Swiss German cards. So the Swiss playing card enthusiasts have their own deck of playing cards, called both German or Swiss German cards. They are used in Switzerland for card games like Piquet or Jass. Jass is the national card game of Switzerland other popular Swiss card games are Piquet, Schnaps, Schafkopf, and Skat. The playing cards in Switzerland feature the Swiss German style suits Acorns (Eicheln), Shields (Schilten), Roses (Rosen) and Bells (Schellen). The values are Sixes to Nine, Banner, Under, Top, King and Ace.

AGM AGMüller & Piatnik
With over 190 years of experience, AGM AGMüller is the Swiss market leader for playing cards in Switzerland. Founded in the Schaffhausen area in 1828, AGM AGMüller now belongs to the global playing card company Cartamundi. The Swiss-based playing card factory AGM AGMüller was acquired in 2001 by the Cartamundi group from Turnhout in Belgium. Since its foundation in 1824, the Austrian playing card producer Piatnik has been making many regional playing cards especially for the Swiss market. For example, the Wiener Spielkartenfabrik Ferd. Piatnik & Söhn makes the extremely popular Jass playing cards and Piquet playing cards exclusively for fans of Swiss card games.

Discover our complete range with Swiss playing cards our German playing card shop specialized in playing cards from Switzerland, all are available from www.playingcards.de.

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